Krischan Photography
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Garden Insects

Harmful Insect
Photograph
Description and observations
Milkweed Tussock Moth
Harmful Insect
Additional Image
Additional Image

Observed: 8/30/2006 - Caterpillar found eating the leaves of Tropical Milkweed, Asclepias curassivica. About 0.5 inches long.
White Marked Tussock Moth
Harmful Insect
Additional Image

Observed: 8/30/2006 - Caterpillar found scurying across the lawn. About 1.5 inches long.
Common asparagus beetle
Harmful Insect

Observed: 6/12/2009 - We observed 10-20 Common asparagus beetles eating top ferny foliage of asparagus plants.
Spotted asparagus beetle
Harmful Insect

Observed: 6/12/2009 - We observed 10-20 Spotted asparagus beetles eating top ferny foliage of asparagus plants.
Tortoise beetle
Harmful Insect

Observed: 6/12/2009 - We observed Tortoise beetles eating leaves of potato plants.
Potato flea beetle
Harmful Insect

Observed: 6/12/2009 - We observed Potato flea beetles eating leaves of potato plants.
Eastern tent caterpillar
Harmful Insect

Observed: 6/12/2009 - We observed Eastern tent caterpillar.
Four lined plant bug nymph
Harmful Insect

Observed: 6/12/2009 - We observed Four lined plant bug nymph.
Eriophyid mite
Harmful Insect
Additional Image

Observed: 6/16/2010, 6/14/2009 - Red Erineum on the leaves of River Birch is caused by an Eriophyid Mite. It is only under rare circumstances that a pesticide application is recommended. Eriophyid mites do very little damage to plants and most plants can tolerate huge populations. On our trees, this pest condition presents annually each June.
Plume moth larvae
Harmful Insect

Observed: 6/6/2009 - We observed Plume moth larvae on Joe-Pye-Weed. Adult moths emerge during the spring and lay eggs on leaves. Hatched larvae feed on upper leaf surfaces. Typically, plume moth larva fold and web the edges of a terminal leaf together and feed within the fold.
Twomarked treehopper
Innocuous Insect

Observed: 7/28/2009 - We observed Twomarked treehopper, Enchenopa binotata, on the green stems of our young Magnolia trees. They aggregate near the tip of the branch. Twomarked treehopper is reported to occur west of the Rockies, but yet, here it is in Wisconsin.

"There may be as many as 9 species that look alike - we find them in Wisconsin and many eastern states."
- Phil Pellitteri, Insect Diagnostic Lab, University of Wisconsin, Department of Entomology


Rust
Photograph
Description and observations
Rust
Disease
Additional Image

Observed: 5/24/2008 - Rust infection on Arisaema triphyllum, Jack In The Pulpit. This rust displayed on all 20 A. triphyllum plants on our shady hillside garden. Plants were visibly in decline. The rust seems to only infect A. triphyllum and no other neighboring plants.

"This rust is caused by Uromyces ari-tryphylli. This is an autoecious rust (i.e., needs only one host to complete it's life cycle). Unfortunately, there's not much one can do about this disease because the pathogen basically becomes systemic and once infected, plants stay infected. About all you can do is live with the disease (with the possibility that the disease will spread to other Jacks), or to dig up the affected plants and destroy them."
- Brian Hudelson, Plant Disease Diagnostics Clinic, University of Wisconsin-Madison


Beneficial Insect
Photograph
Description and observations
Viceroy Butterfly
Beneficial Insect
Additional Image

Observed: 9/3/2007 - Viceroy found on 'Lady in Red' Salvia.


Beneficial Insect
Photograph
Description and observations
Ichneumonid wasp
Beneficial Insect
Additional Image

Observed: 6/10/2008 - On wood pile in our garage.

"This is a type of Ichneumonid wasp, Megarhyssa macrurus. It is a female that is using her long ovipositor to lay eggs in wood, the larvae are parasite of the horntail (Siricid), a type of wood feeding wasp."
- Phil Pellitteri, Insect Diagnostic Lab, University of Wisconsin, Department of Entomology

Ichneumonid wasp
Beneficial Insect
Additional Image

Observed: 6/10/2008 - On wood pile in our garage. This is another Ichneumonid wasp, found with female Megarhyssa macrurus.

"In the genus Megarhyssa and is a male, I can not be sure of the species. There are four species found in the US. This one looks like Megarhyssa atrata, but could also be another species.

Both landed on exact same log in stack of over 500 pieces.

"Suspect they know which one has the wood wasps in them. We do find more than one species in an area, but this suggest you have a couple, suspect they are both M. macrurus."
- Phil Pellitteri, Insect Diagnostic Lab, University of Wisconsin, Department of Entomology


Beneficial Insect
Photograph
Description and observations
Monarch butterfly eggs
Beneficial Insect

Observed: 6/12/2009 - Monarch Butterfly eggs about two days old. We observed Monarch land and deposit eggs on Asclepias incarnata, Swamp Milkweed.